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Milan police use KeyCrime delia(R) to help end “retrò” crime series

A robber with a taste for antique weaponry was arrested in Milan after a robbery in Via Millelire. The police were forewarned and already on the scene when the 52 year old robber struck thanks to the Police’s VI Mobile Squad and a little help from the software KeyCrime delia®.
With a hoodie and a mask, the 52 year old robber thought each raid was a sure thing. Each time he would study the situation in the pharmacy or supermarket, pretending to be a customer, proceed to the cash register as though to make a purchase and then pull out a replica antique revolver. His age, the old-style revolver and his habit of leaving through the back door (in Italian: “retro”) all led to the investigators pursuing the case to nickname the crime series “retrò”.

HBO Vice – The Milan police have a high-tech solution to catch robbers

A rank-and-file officer in the Milan Police Department created a computer program called KeyCrime that has revolutionised how the city catches robbers. When Mario Venturi was assigned to the property division in 2004, his team worked without the help of computers. Venturi thought there was a better way and enlisted the help of some programmer friends to design an algorithm to automate investigation. He convinced his bosses to put the software into action in 2008. Since the Milan Police Department started using KeyCrime, the number of robberies in the city has fallen by 51 percent while the rate of solved cased increased to 60 percent.

Superquark – 7 Agosto 2014

Milan and its province an area of ​​1,500 square kilometers inhabited by almost 4 million people. Confused among these citizens who hurry to the workplace, the perpetrators of the more than 2000 robberies carried out every year also wander undisturbed. Covered face and gun in hand, the criminals carry out from 5 to 6 robberies a day against supermarkets, pharmacies, banks and shops in general. Police footage highlights the speed with which criminals take possession of the loot and then vanish into thin air. 75 percent of robberies remain unsolved. When the wheel arrives on the spot, the criminals have long since disappeared and the agents have no choice but to collect the witnesses’ accounts and draw up the minutes. Recently, however, something has changed.